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Canadian Map.jpg

Fun game to learn the provinces.
Fun game to learn the provinces.

Canadian Geographic
Canadian Geographic


Welcome to Canada, our big neighbor to the North!

Cool Things to Know About Canada

Here are some statistics about Canada:
  • In terms of land mass, Canada is the second largest country in the world. It has 9,971,000 square kilometers.
  • Canada is the fifth largest producer of energy in the world.
  • In terms of population to land mass (population density), Canada has only three people per one square kilometer. That makes it the country with the fourth lowest population density worldwide.
  • No country in the world has higher enrollment in college and university education than Canada.
  • Canada can claim the world's smallest jail, which is in Ontario. It is only 24.3 square meters.
  • Canada is the ninth largest economy in the world.
  • The town of New Quebec, Canada has the world's largest meteor crater.
  • One tenth of the world's forests are in Canada.
  • More than 32 million people live in Canada.
  • About 6 million Canadians speak French.
  • You can find the world's longest coastline in Canada.
  • Canada doesn't have states. It has 10 provinces and three territories.
  • Canada is so vast that its East Coast is geographically closer to London, England than to its own West Coast.
  • Thanksgiving is celebrated on the second Monday in October in Canada.
  • Canada has the fifth largest island in the world - Baffin Island, which is larger than all but two American states.
  • Canada means 'village' or 'settlement' in Iroquois.
  • The United States-Canadian border is the world's longest shared border. It is also the world's longest unprotected border.
  • It is widely believed that Santa Claus is from Canada.
  • Many people believe that Canada owns the North Pole. It doesn't.
  • Canada's largest city, Toronto, has about five million people.
  • Almost half of Canada's population were born in other countries.
  • Every year, Quebec City has a hotel made entirely of ice. The hotel melts in the summer, but is rebuilt every winter.
  • Canada only has one desert.

Canadian Province Project:

You will need to create six slides or a six sided box.
These slides will be about geography, government, aboriginal people, history, economy, and citations.
You can use Glogster to create slides.
Here is a couple of How to Videos:


Directions for teachers:

Outline of what you need to cover:

Geography:




Government:



What is a parliamentary government?

Basic Definition of Parliamentary Government

What is a parliamentary government? Generally speaking, parliamentary governments are defined by an absence of clear separation between two key branches of government: the legislative branch, which is responsible for enacting laws, and the executive branch, which is responsible for implementing laws. Instead, in parliamentary governments, the executive branch is “fused with” and “dependent upon” the legislative branch.
In Canada’s parliamentary system, this interrelationship between the legislative and executive branches is expressed in several ways. First, key members of the executive, such as the Prime Minister and Cabinet, are usually drawn directly from the legislative branch. The Prime Minister, for example, is usually an elected member of the House of Commons. As such, s/he performs the dual functions of leading the government, as well as representing his/her riding as a regular member of the House of Commons.
Second, and more importantly, the executive branch is completely dependent upon the legislative branch for its authority. The Prime Minister and Cabinet cannot decide the direction of government or administer enacted laws if it does not enjoy the continual support of the majority of members in the House of Commons. If the executive loses majority support in the legislature, then typically the government will fall, and elections will be held to select a new executive.

How does this compare to the United State's system of government?

Comparison to Other Systems of Government

The parliamentary system of government can be contrasted to other sorts of government; in particular, presidential systems found in countries such as the United States. Presidential governments have a clear separation between the executive and legislative branches of government.
In the US, for example, the leader of the executive branch, the President, is not drawn from the legislative branch, but is elected separately in presidential elections. Moreover, the President does not depend upon the legislative branch for his/her authority. S/he does not need majority support in the legislature in order to maintain power, but instead governs until the next presidential election. (However, in the US, the legislative branch can remove the President if he/she found guilty of committing certain wrongdoings.)
The parliamentary system of government can also be contrasted with hybrid systems that include aspects of both the parliamentary and presidential governments. France, for example, has both a President, who exercises power independent of the legislative branch, and a Prime Minister, who is directly dependent upon the support of the elected members of the French legislature.

What is Canada's political system?

In Canada, there are 3 levels of government. Each level of government has different responsibilities.

  • Federal government (the Government of Canada) - Responsible for things that affect the whole country, such as citizenship and immigration, national defence and trade with other countries.
  • Provincial and territorial governments (for example, the Province of Ontario) - Responsible for such things as education, health care and highways.
  • Municipal (local) governments (cities, towns, and villages in Ontario) - Responsible for firefighting, city streets and other local matters. If there is no local government, the province provides services.

Federal Government

At the federal level, there are 3 parts of government:
  • Elizabeth II, Queen of Canada, is Canada's formal head of state. The Governor Generalrepresents the Queen in Canada and carries out the duties of head of state.
  • The House of Commons makes Canada's laws. Canadians elect representatives to the House of Commons. These representatives are called Members of Parliament (MPs)and usually belong to a political party. The political party that has the largest number of MPs forms the government, and its leader becomes prime minister.
  • The prime minister is the head of government in Canada. The Prime Minister chooses MPs to serve as ministers in the cabinet. There are ministers for citizenship and immigration, justice and other subjects. The cabinet makes important decisions about government policy.
  • The Senate reviews laws that are proposed by the House of Commons. Senators come from across Canada. The prime minister chooses the senators.
You can read the Guide to the Canadian House of Commons for more information.

Provincial Government

At the provincial level:
  • The Lieutenant Governor represents the Queen.
  • The Legislative Assembly makes law. In Ontario, elected representatives are calledMembers of Provincial Parliament (MPPs).
The political party that has the largest number of MPPs forms the government, and its leader becomes premier. The premier is the head of government in Ontario.
The premier leads the government and chooses MPPs to serve as ministers in the cabinet. The cabinet sets government policy and introduces laws for the Legislative Assembly to consider.
Visit Civics 101 for more information about how the provincial government works. Watch videos and interviews with politicians, ask an MPP your questions, use a budget simulator and more.

Municipal (Local) Government

At the municipal level:
  • The Province of Ontario defines the structure, finances, and management of the local governments of cities, towns and villages.
  • Residents of the municipality elect the mayor and council members to lead the local government. Committees of councillors discuss budget, service and administrative issues that are then passed on to the council for debate. Citizens, business owners and community groups can present their concerns to councillors at committee meetings.
  • Municipalities may also be part of a larger county or regional government (for example,York Region).

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Economy:




Bar Graphs comparing Canada to other economic country groups
Bar Graphs comparing Canada to other economic country groups


The below site is very informative. It is worth a visit.

Canada Economy

By: EconomyWatch Content Date: 11 March 2010
Canadian Economy Broken Down
Canada Facts for Kids: Economy
• Canada is the second largest oil reserve holder after Saudi Arabia
• Canada is the leader in uranium mining. And uranium is used in nuclear power plants for producing electricity.
• Canada is the world leader of Hydro Electricity.
• Canada is second in sawn softwood production after the USA.


Aboriginal Tribes:



external image canada_map.gif

List of tribes and locations

Fabulous site with resources for First Nations in each province.
Fabulous site with resources for First Nations in each province.

History of Canada


Banner: The Kids' Site of Canadian Settlement
Banner: The Kids' Site of Canadian Settlement



Organized videos of Canadian History
Watchknow.org Home - educational videos, school, free, share, teachers, students, educators, education, parents, home school, homeschool, homeschooling, preschool, k12, k-12, preK-12, kids, children, watchknowlearn.org, watch know, watchnow, watch now, wiki, collaboration, online community
Watchknow.org Home - educational videos, school, free, share, teachers, students, educators, education, parents, home school, homeschool, homeschooling, preschool, k12, k-12, preK-12, kids, children, watchknowlearn.org, watch know, watchnow, watch now, wiki, collaboration, online community


Project II
==Tag Canadian Places





Google earth tour.gif
Create a tour of your assigned province.


Project III

Create Museum BoxesThe below video explains what museum boxes are and how they work.


This is a link to museum boxes:
Museum Boxes

This is the layout for your Museum Boxes;
  • You will have a 2 x 2 drawer.
  • You will have four cubes
    • Places
    • Indigenous Tribes
    • Economics
    • Government
  • Each cube will have a title and a bibliography page.
    • This is an example of a title
Sites to See
In
Ontario
Now you will have four faces of your cube left. Download the template below which will let you know what needs to be on those four faces.


This is a brochure project to use for your colony:

Canadian Brochure Project