What is Perspective:





About Linear Perspective


Linear perspective in painting is a set of rules used to draw 3-dimensional objects on a flat (2-dimensional) surface. The subject can be quite elaborate but luckily you don't need to become an expert to be able to draw well. There are 2 basic rules of linear perspective that you need to remember:
  1. Objects that are closer appear bigger.
  2. Parallel lines intersect at the horizon.
We will elaborate on these 2 points below.

perspective example
perspective example
Click to enlarge image

Rule #1: Objects that are closer appear bigger.


Take a look at the drawing on the left. It depicts 3 black paintings hanging on a wall.

Do you think the paintings are of the same size in real life?
Are they the same size on the drawing?

The answer to the first question is YES. The paintings depicted here are of the same size in real life. The answer to the second question is NO. On the drawing, you can clearly see how the size of the paintings changes with distance. As the distance increases, so the paintings appear smaller. The painting that is the closest to us is the biggest one, the second is smaller and the last one is the smallest.

perspective, parallel lines intersect a the the horizon
perspective, parallel lines intersect a the the horizon
Click to enlarge image

Rule #2: Parallel lines intersect at the horizon.


Take a look at the drawing on the left. It depicts railroad lines.

Do rails ever intersect in real life?
Do they intersect on the drawing?

The answer to the first question is of course NO. Rails never intersect in real life, they are parallel to each other.
The answer to the second question is YES. If you look inside the tunnel you will notice that all 4 rails (that are parallel to each other in real life) are going to meet at the same point. This point will be on the horizon.

one point perspective cube example
one point perspective cube example

One Point Perspective Example


The drawing on the left depicts a cube drawn in a 1 point perspective.
One point perspective is used to draw objects that are directly facing the viewer.

two point perspective cube example
two point perspective cube example
Click to enlarge image

Two Point Perspective Example


The drawing on the left depicts a cube drawn in a 2 point perspective.
2 point perspective is the most commonly used in drawing. The cube on the left is a very good example of both rules of linear perspective. Notice how the frontal edge appears bigger (rule #1). Also notice how parallel lines converge to the same point on the horizon (rule #2).

three point perspective cube example
three point perspective cube example
Click to enlarge image

Three Point Perspective Example


The drawing on the left depicts a cube drawn in a 3 point perspective.
3 point perspective is rarely used in drawing. It is required when drawing very tall objects, such as buildings.

interior with 2 point perspective
interior with 2 point perspective
Click to enlarge image
The perspective sketch from the video. Example of Two point perspective.
street with one point perspective drawing
street with one point perspective drawing
Click to enlarge image
A sketch of a street. Example of One point perspective.



Forests using one point perspective
Forests using one point perspective

Practice Drawing a book in one-point perspective:

external image magic-book.jpg
Perspective from an graphic novelist:


Drawing Landscape: Halloween




Drawing a building:




Draw a Cabin: Christmas







How to Draw a City Scape:





A city scape in one point perspective:
City Streets in 1 Point Perspective
City Streets in 1 Point Perspective



CGarchitect - Professional 3D Architectural Visualization User Community | Inspiration - One Point Perspective Vol. 1
CGarchitect - Professional 3D Architectural Visualization User Community | Inspiration - One Point Perspective Vol. 1

Drawing Steps for One Point Perspective



external image 07Street.jpg
external image people-walking-city-streets-3-big.jpg

external image City-Street.jpg
external image Dark_City_Street_by_dev_MaTuS.jpg
I have had several emails about how to do the One point perspective paintings from this post, http://www.elementaryartfun.blogspot.com/search/label/One%20Point%20Perspective
so I have written the steps for this drawing.
I would suggest, the bigger paper, the better.
Before you begin, be sure to show students many images to get them excited and print a variety of photos to inspire creativity!
1. Begin with the horizon line in the middle (please excuse my very crooked lines!!! pencil did not photograph well, so I had to redraw some lines with my computer mouse)
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edit9

2. Draw a dot in the middle (vanishing point) and make an “X” from corner to corner (or close enough) passing through the dot
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edit5

3.draw the sidewalks first from the vanishing point
4. Draw the trees starting on the bottom on the “X” all the way to the vanishing point, descending towards the middle. Tell them to draw organic shaped trees, not round Que-tip lollypop trees! Make sure the trees are straight and parallel to the side of the paper. Watch students for this before they spend 20 minutes drawing 8 beautiful but very leaning trees and have to erase all of them!
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edit6

5. This is the lingo I use to teach the buildings, We all say, “One, straight out, two diagonal down, three, straight down to the ground, four straight down again, and five, bring it in along the side!”
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edit7

6. When I show them the windows we start with the side with the door facing the street.
The lines on the tops and bottoms of the windows ABOVE the horizon line are parallel to the top part of the “X”…….below that, when you PASS the Horizon line, the lines on the tops and bottoms of the windows are parallel to the BOTTOM part of the “X” which is now the sidewalk. The top of the door is also parallel to the sidewalk.
below: RED parallel to RED and BLUE parallel to BLUE
The windows on the OTHER side of the house are normal right angle squares or rectangles.
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edit10

7. Now erase the “X” and the parts of the horizon line that overlap the trees and buildings
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edit3

8. finish windows and add details. Some students made it into a river instead of a road. Now that the basic foundation is drawn, the possibilities for creativity are ENDLESS!!
Cars, trucks, planes, restaurants, people, bridges, parades, parks, pedestrians, lights, etc, etc

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edit2

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edit15

[edit5%255B4%255D.jpg]
[edit5%255B4%255D.jpg]

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edit10

Art lessons from Belgium - one point perspective
Art lessons from Belgium - one point perspective

One-point perspective art lesson
One-point perspective art lesson


What can you do with one-point perspective using a city scape?
One Point Perspective
One Point Perspective

cities of the world
cities of the world

Name Perspective:




5th - step by step printout for block lettering in 1 pt. perspective
5th - step by step printout for block lettering in 1 pt. perspective

One-Point Perspective:


In Doors:










Bird's Eye:


One Point Perspective City tut by ~Swingerzetta on deviantART
One Point Perspective City tut by ~Swingerzetta on deviantART

perspective & value
perspective & value










modern art and perspective:


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Fantasy Fun - one point perspective landscape. Dr Seuss
Fantasy Fun - one point perspective landscape. Dr Seuss



external image onepointperspective.jpg?w=450

one point perspective
one point perspective


An Ant's Perspective

Usborne Art Ideas; Big Book of Things to Draw
Usborne Art Ideas; Big Book of Things to Draw